The importance of using a tripod

David Corrigan, of Big Island Video News, and his new GoPro camera. Photography by Baron Sekiya | Hawaii 24/7

David Corrigan, of Big Island Video News, and his new GoPro camera. Photography by Baron Sekiya | Hawaii 24/7

By Baron Sekiya, Hawaii 24/7

When shooting video, especially HD video, using a tripod will get you superior results unless you’re going for the Law & Order TV show shaky-cam effect.

The higher definition cameras especially need a good solid base since people will be watching the images on large TV sets or computer monitors. So even though Dave’s GoPro Hero 4 is a tiny camera it can actually shoot video at 4K (Ultra HD) resolution. Sure this a bit overkill for the tiny camera but it’s his standard tripod that was being used¬†earlier with¬†his big camera.

If you’re shooting video try to get a real video tripod with a fluid head for smooth pans and a cup/ball leveler so viewers won’t get nauseated when you pan your shots. If the camera platform on the tripod can flip to the vertical position that’s usually a giveaway that it’s a still photo tripod since you don’t normally shoot verticals when doing video.

Even smartphone videos are much improved by using a tripod since you’ll get a clear, steady image without the noise of your fingers accidently brushing against the phone case. Photographers call them tripods, videographers call them ‘sticks’ and some may call them ‘legs’ if they’re talking about the leg part of the tripod instead of the ‘head’ or camera platform.

In any case, get a tripod, keep the image level, don’t bump it, don’t bump into other people’s tripods and buy an extra tripod plate for your camera because you’re going to lose or misplace the one you’ve got. Trust me on this. When you let your cousin Tony borrow your tripod while he’s on his Hawaiian vacation and he flies back to Minnesota with the plate still attached to his camera’s tripod socket you’ll be glad you have an extra.

You can find Dave’s videos at www.bigislandvideone…